Born Digital 2016: Collecting for the future


Since the first public website was published 25 years ago, there has been an explosion of digital content – from supercomputers exploring the universe to Facebook posts with friends. In a world where so much of our lives is captured online, how do we make sense of all that information and make sure it isn’t lost to future generations?

Born Digital 2016 explores the questions around collecting and preserving digital content through a series of fascinating online interviews with expert speakers for each theme made available daily. More information on programs or state events can be found on the NLA website.

LINC Tasmania's Tasmanian Archive and Heritage collections include over  270,000 digital items - websites, e-publications, databases, digitised images, and scans of hardcopy records. We are committed to collecting and preserving these items for Tasmanians to access now and in the future.


​Migrate your old files from floppy disk to flash drive

All week at rural and urban LINCs across the state

As an example of the difficulties faced by constantly evolving technologies, for the duration of Born Digital each of our regional and urban LINC's will have a floppy drive available for you to transfer any files you may have on a floppy disk to your personal flash drive. Simply visit a participating location and and follow the step-by-step instructions of this hand out.



​Free Seminar: How to manage your digital life (Hobart)

Thursday 11 August 1pm - 2pm, with Timothy Elliot and Nicki Ottavi

Our personal photos, emails, videos, audio and records are important possessions. They record the details of our lives and help to define us. Increasingly these items are created and stored in digital formatsWhat is the best way to preserve your digital possessions? Come along to this lunchtime seminar to hear Nicki and Tim explain simple ways to preserve digital photographs, emails, recordings and documents. View on Eventbrite


​Preserving film in Tasmania (2016)

Explore LINC Tasmania's historic treasures online!

The Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office have an annual plan to copy selected material and make it available online. The copying focuses on items that are frequently used by family and local historians and on films, photographs, maps and plans of interest to researchers. It is part of the Department of Education's LINC Tasmania strategy to make information accessible as widely as possible. View our video or visit our film and audio page to see more.



Day 1: Science & space

Monday 8 August, with Dr Alan Duffy.

Astronomy in the 21st century produces vast quantities of complex data – the equivalent of the entire internet is generated each day. What do we do with this volume of data and how do we make sense of it? As we continue to explore the universe and reach further in the unknown, what are the challenges and opportunities ahead? Video now available!

Day 2: Indigenous voices

Tuesday 9 August, with Dr Rachael Ka'ai-Mahuta.

Digital technology allows marginal communities to have a voice, challenging the dominance of imperialist power structures. What role can digital technology play in the preservation of Indigenous cultures in a postcolonial world? Video now available!

Day 3: Truth & history

Wednesday 10 August, with John Birmingham.

The rise of citizen journalist offers alternative views to officially recorded history in every tweet, blog and post. Why is it so important for libraries to preserve Facebook, Twitter and other online conversations? How would our world today be understood 100 years from now if these millions of diverse voices from around the world were lost? Video now available!

​Day 4: Digital lifestyles

Thursday 11 August, with Dr Rebecca Huntley.

We create digital content in every aspect of our lives. Where once our precious documents were letters, diaries and photo albums, today they may be emails, blogs and Instagram accounts. How would we feel if we lost those electronic records, and what impact would that have on our personal and collective history? Video now available!

Day 5: Play

Friday 12 August, with Steven O'Donnell (Bajo) and Stephenie Bendixsen (Hex).

Computer games have been part of our lives for more than 40 years. Over that time they have evolved in complexity and become one of the largest entertainment mediums of the 21st century. What games do we play today and what do they say about us? How can we preserve these games and our social interactions with them, and why is this important? Video now available!